Is Kitsune the same as gumiho?

Is Kitsune the same as gumiho?

Taiping Guangji claims Silla worshipped foxes as sacred beings. The most distinctive feature that separates the kumiho from its two counterparts (Japanese kitsune, and Chinese huli jing) is the existence of a ‘yeowoo guseul’ (여우구슬, literally meaning fox marble/bead) which is said to consist of knowledge.

How is Lee Yeon still a fox at the end?

It’s a happy ending: Yeon reincarnates into the mortal world and reunites with his lady love Ji-ah. Later, he gets the hint of Rang’s supposed reincarnation as a young boy. The finale also hints that Yeon is still a fox.

Is there a season 2 for Tale of the nine tailed fox?

So, all is not over yet! The Tale of the Nine Tailed is a romantic fantasy drama that tells the story of a nine-tailed mythical fox from a Korean folktale. The unique nine-tailed fox is called the gumiho.

Why is Lee Yeon still a fox?

However, we discover that Yeon is still a gumiho, the nine tailed mythical fox. When Yeon is reincarnated as a result of his brother Rang’s sacrifice, it is assumed that he is reborn as a human, that is, without his gumiho powers.

What makes the kumiho different from other kitsune?

Taiping Guangji claims Silla worshipped foxes as sacred beings. The most distinctive feature that separates the kumiho from its two counterparts (Japanese kitsune, and Chinese huli jing) is the existence of a ‘yeowoo guseul’ (여우구슬, literally meaning fox marble/bead) which is said to consist of knowledge.

How does the yeowoo guseul help the kumiho?

According to Korean mythology, the yeowoo guseul provides power to the kumiho and knowledge (and intelligence) to people if they can steal and swallow one. The kumiho can absorb humans’ energy with it. The method of absorbing energy with the “yeowoo guseul” resembles a “deep kiss” (i.e. a kiss using tongue).

How is the Korean kumiho similar to the Chinese huli jing?

Korean kumiho shares many similarities to the Chinese huli jing and the Japanese kitsune. It can freely transform, among other things, into a beautiful woman often set out to seduce boys, and eat their liver or heart (depending on the legend).

Where can I find the story of the kumiho?

There are numerous tales in which the kumiho appears, several of which can be found in the encyclopedic Compendium of Korean Oral Literature (한국 구비문학 대계/韓國口碑文學大系).