Is pectus excavatum a connective tissue disease?

Is pectus excavatum a connective tissue disease?

Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder.

How do you treat pectus excavatum?

Pectus excavatum can be surgically repaired, but surgery is usually reserved for people who have moderate to severe signs and symptoms. People who have mild signs and symptoms may be helped by physical therapy.

How do you fix pectus excavatum without surgery?

The vacuum bell is a non-surgical treatment option for patients with mild or moderate pectus excavatum. While this procedure is non-surgical, it should be used under the supervision of our care team. The vacuum bell is fitted to each patient to sit comfortably on the chest.

How do you fix a funnel chest?

Doctors also might recommend physical therapy and exercises to strengthen the chest muscles improve posture. Mild pectus excavatum in young patients often can be treated at home with a vacuum bell device. In this nonsurgical approach, the bell device is placed on the chest.

How is pectus excavatum a connective tissue disorder?

Pectus excavatum can also be associated with connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome. Pectus excavatum is diagnosed by a thorough health history and physical examination. Diagnostic imaging tests are used to get a detailed look at your child’s condition. A CT scan of the chest is essential as it provides the Haller index.

Is there surgery for pectus excavatum in children?

The treatment of pectus excavatum is dependent upon the severity of the defect and your child’s symptoms. In most cases, surgery is not indicated. At CHOP, we offer two different treatments for pectus excavatum.

Can a pectus excavatum be done for low morbidity?

The procedure and its variations yield excellent results with low morbidity, and it is ideal for individuals with a combination excavatum and carinatum defect, severe asymmetry, or extensive defects of the upper ribs and cartilage.

How is pectus excavatum related to Marfan syndrome?

Pectus excavatum can also be associated with connective tissue disorders such as Marfan syndrome. Pectus excavatum is diagnosed by a thorough health history and physical examination.