What is Jones correspondent inference theory?

What is Jones correspondent inference theory?

Correspondent inference theory is a psychological theory proposed by Edward E. Jones and Keith E. Davis (1965) that “systematically accounts for a perceiver’s inferences about what an actor was trying to achieve by a particular action”.

What does the correspondent inference theory state?

The correspondent inference theory describes the conditions under which we make dispositional attributes to the behavior we perceive as intentional. Davis used the term correspondent inference to refer to an occasion when an observer infers that a person’s behavior matches or corresponds with their personality.

What is non correspondent inference?

An example of this would be if you observe one person striking another person and you infer that the perpetrator is a violent person, then that is a correspondent inference. However, if you attribute the action to something different, for example, an accident or play-acting, this would be a non-correspondent inference.

Who gave the theory of correspondence inference?

Correspondent inference theory has been revised over the years, but the original formulation of the theory was published by Jones and Keith Davis in 1965. The 1960s through most of the 1970s was a period of time in social psychology when logic and rationality were emphasized.

What was the purpose of the correspondent inference theory?

Correspondent inference theory is a psychological theory proposed by Edward E. Jones and Keith E. Davis (1965) that “systematically accounts for a perceiver’s inferences about what an actor was trying to achieve by a particular action”. The purpose of this theory is to explain why people make internal or external attributions.

How are dispositional attributions related to correspondent inference?

Dispositional (i.e., internal) attributions provide us with information from which we can make predictions about a person’s future behavior. The correspondent inference theory describes the conditions under which we make dispositional attributes to the behavior we perceive as intentional.

What was Jones and Davis correspondent inference theory?

Jones & Davis Correspondent Inference Theory. Jones and Davis (1965) thought that people pay particular attention to intentional behavior (as opposed to accidental or unthinking behavior). Jones and Davis’ theory helps us understand the process of making an internal attribution.

When to use non common effects in correspondent inference?

If choices have a great deal in common, a perceiver has little to work with to infer a correspondent disposition. The more distinctive each choice is from the others, the more can be inferred from the course of action chosen. This is known as non-common effects.