How can I volunteer to read for the blind?

How can I volunteer to read for the blind?

How To Volunteer To Read. Before you are eligible to become a volunteer broadcaster for Gatewave, you must take and pass our audition for reading aloud. The audition includes a 100-word pronunciation test and several brief excerpts of reading from newspapers and magazines. The reading test takes about 15 minutes.

Is audible free for the blind?

If you search online for “free audio books,” you will find that there are seemingly many sources available. Sites like Audible and All You Can Books offer their services with a free trial period to entice people to try them out. One thing you will find, though, is that few audio book services are truly 100% free.

How do blinds record books?

Familiarised with the audio recording software. Assigned a book (in English language) to record. After the orientation, volunteers can take upto a week to record their designated books and share the audio file. It usually takes about 3-4 hours to record these books.

What kind of books are available for the blind?

The Books for the Blind Program is an initiative of the United States National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS) which provides audio recordings of books free of charge to people who are blind or visually impaired.

When did MI9 become part of MI19?

It was originally created in December 1940 as MI9a, a sub-section of MI9. A year later, in December 1941, it became an independent organisation, though still closely associated with its parent. MI19 had Combined Services Detailed Interrogation Centres (CSDIC) at Beaconsfield, Wilton Park, and Latimer, as well as a number overseas.

When did the National Library Service for the blind make records?

Finally, in 1933, AFB produced two types of machines – one spring driven and the other a combination electric radio and phonograph. A durable record was perfected, recorded at 150 grooves to an inch, so that a book of 60,000 words could be contained on eight or nine double-faced, twelve-inch records.

When was recording for the blind and dyslexic founded?

RFB&D is now Learning Ally! Founded in 1948 as Recording for the Blind, Learning Ally serves more than 300,000 K-12, college and graduate students, veterans and lifelong learners – all of whom cannot read standard print due to blindness, visual impairment, dyslexia, or other learning disabilities.

Who are Learning Ally and recording for the blind?

Founded in 1948 as Recording for the Blind, Learning Ally serves more than 300,000 K-12, college and graduate students, veterans and lifelong learners – all of whom cannot read standard print due to blindness, visual impairment, dyslexia, or other learning disabilities.