What are open minded portraits?

What are open minded portraits?

An open-mind portrait gives you the chance to illustrate aspects of a book’s character at important times during the story. To help students think more in depth about a character and reflect on story events from the character’s viewpoint.

How would you apply open mind portraits in a classroom setting?

How to use:

  1. Students make a portrait of a character.
  2. Cut out the portrait and thinking pages.
  3. Students draw and write about what the character/ person thinks on the opposite side of the picture of the face.
  4. Students share their portraits with classmates, discussing both their picture and the thinking page.

What is a mind portrait?

openmind. Open-Mind Portraits. Open-Mind Portraits enable a student to identify one element of story structure, character identification. This project helps the students to identify with the character’s feelings, attitudes and point of view.

What is sketch to stretch strategy?

Sketch-to-Stretch is a visualizing strategy which engages the readers to form mental images while reading a text. It is a reading strategy that teaches readers to interpret texts through drawings.

How do you do an open minded portrait?

To complete an open-minded portrait, student first had to draw the head of their character as they envisioned him or her based off of details from the book. Then they were to create another page that depicts how a this character was thinking or feeling during a specific moment in the book.

Why do you need an open mind portrait rubric?

Open Mind Portraits are a great way for students to show what they know about a specific character. In addition, it allows the students to think creatively and make some inferences about a character. This is a rubric I created to grade open mind portraits that my students create. *Use with any picture or chapter book!

How to make a portrait of a character?

Students make a portrait of a character. They can draw it by hand or use the fillable. Draw & color large portrait (head & neck). 2. Cut out the portrait and thinking pages. 3. Students draw and write about what the character/ person thinks on the opposite side of the picture of the face. This is the “thinking page”.

When do students share their portraits with classmates?

Students share their portraits with classmates, discussing both their picture and the thinking page. McLaughlin, M. & Allen, M.B. (2001). Guided comprehension: A teaching model for grades 3-8. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.